Trim Carpentry (cont., pg. 4)


Things You Need To Do

● Order materials and have them on site when he is ready to start.

 

 crown molding

 

The photo above illustrates one of the many ways you can get creative with trim.  A single piece of crown mold is attached at ceiling level.  A smaller piece of trim is attached four inches below on the wall.  

The wall space in between is not covered with any trim, but is painted the same color as the trim, giving the effect of triple crown mold, eight inches high.  It’s an inexpensive way to get an expensive look.


Things You Should Watch For


On another page, I write about how you can and should take an active role in seeing that you subcontractors don’t make avoidable mistakes.  Contractors, even the really good ones, can and sometimes do make mistakes.

You don’t have to be an expert yourself to spot these mistakes and get them corrected while it’s still easy to do.  Here are some things you can double-check.  Remember, double-checking is all you’re doing.  You’re not telling how to do his job, so don’t worry that you’re stepping out of line.  It’s your house.

● Just give everything a good, hard look.  If it all looks good to your eye, there shouldn’t be any problem.

If something doesn’t look quite right, point it out and get it adjusted, preferably immediately.

The only inspection issue you should have to face with trim carpentry is the stairs.  This involves the height (risers) and width (treads) of the stairs.  You should have already covered that issue with your framer.  If the framer gets it right when he roughs in the stairs, the finished stairs should be right as well.

Your finish stair builder should have full knowledge of code requirements concerning handrails and pickets.

 

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