House Plans (cont., p.5)

 

Other Considerations


Always keep in mind the size and shape of your lot as your ideas take shape.  Your plan must fit the land with room to spare.

That concept is defined by minimum building lines and easements.  You can easily determine what both of those limitations are, or may be, by consulting the engineering department of your city or county building office.  You should know what these restrictions are before you ever purchase the land, as they may affect the size and shape of the house you build.

 

Your plan may also have to be approved by others.


Many subdivisions have an Owner’s Association with a plan review committee.


Some of these committees can be quite strict in the standards that they apply, and can force house builders into expensive and time-consuming redrawing of their plans.

 

Most of the time the restrictions posed by these committees are for good reason.  Other times it’s because one of the members has too much time on his hands and enjoys his power a little too much ─ getting a weird kick out of making other people’s lives difficult.

In any case, find out early if you will be dealing with an Owner’s Association to avoid
unpleasant surprises. 


It’s Worth A Little Effort

Doing all of the extra things I’ve mentioned here about developing your house plan takes a little more time, but it is well worth it.

There is a lot of time and money to be saved in planning the house plan.

Get plans right from the beginning and you’ll be a much happier house builder.

 

 

Read more about House Plans

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